B.B.Q. Rat, Frog, or Fowl? Battambang to Siem Reap.

May 2019

Our morning agenda consisted of a Soksabike half day bike adventure exploring authentic cottage industries throughout the Cambodian countryside around Battambang. While our Intrepid group and Sareth would exercise all morning cycling 22 km in over 32 degree humid heat…I would play the role of the trusty mascot who would be in charge of purses and backpacks and yell encouragements from my position in the back of a covered Tuk Tuk! Ahhh….Those darn knees of mine!

Although this event was included in our Intrepid tour, it can be booked with Soksabike for $27 US/person. This collage depicts some of our sights and experiences today in Cambodia. 

During the Soksabike tour we stopped at several private homes to observe and learn how various food products were harvested and the locations in which they were created! This video represents our morning adventure from orientation at the bicycle rental through the first two countryside visits.

Please note the variety of housing as we made our way through the lanes and back roads checking out cottage industries off the beaten path of Battambang.  70% of Cambodian population lives in rural locations. We were so appreciative to have the opportunity to learn how products were made in traditional ways by local Khmer and understand how these gentle people lived, worked and survived. 

At the first location we learned about creating rice paper. Although most of the people we visited did not seem to understand English, our tour guide explained about their lifestyle and what was involved to create their product.

We walked past the racks of drying rice paper into the production area/home. Water is collected in huge ceramic pots at the rear of the home. Inside the home the men sleep on mats beside the fire, motorcycle, and drying racks. We were informed it is safer for the women to sleep upstairs. This family unit worked from Dawn to Dusk every day creating rice paper just to make ends meet. The elderly were cared for by the family. While we were at this location, a monk (in orange robes) arrived to collect contributions of food or money. The lady offered him coins from her meager supply.

 

At the second location we learned the process involved to make dried mango and bananas. Wooden boards supported multiple quantities of bright orange mango which rested on leaves while drying in the sun. Flies were plentiful buzzing around the sweet, sticky substances. There were also long poles drying bananas. In the yard we also observed long bamboo poles with baskets on the ends resting against a fence.

Inside the home a table was set with samples of fruit for us to try. While our guide explained the process for drying fruit, the women sat on the floor in the background peeling fruit. There were also some older men baring war wounds and scars who sat silently. When we departed into the yard one of these men demonstrated the long poles with baskets which he had created to assist removing fruit from tall trees. He also demonstrated the stick marionettes he makes and was delighted when Ecaterina and I purchased one.

Resuming our tour, we noticed that children were quick to wave but adults tended to be serious and sometimes seemed uncomfortable towards us.

The second video reflects the continuation of our cycling tour and introduction to more Khmer traditional foods and drinks including bamboo sticky rice sold in long bamboo tubes and another location producing rice wine.

We have seen several rice wine distilleries during our travels though Asia, but this was by far the cleanest and most modern facility I have witnessed. As usual, no rice wine facility is complete without at least one huge poisonous snake sharing its poison in a large clear jug of rice wine!

As we passed a Wat temple three very serious young boys were exiting–possibly studying there?

Following the cycling tour we checked out of the “Classy Hotel” in Battambang and headed to Siem Reap.

Au revoir Battambang. Although it is the second largest city located in northwestern Cambodia we spent very little time here.

We missed seeing the colonial buildings (Sala Khaet), Provincial museum, Khmer temples or 11th Century pagoda. We did experience the Bamboo train, visited Lok Ta Dambong Kra Nhoung statue, and toured through cottage industries.

En route to Siem Reap we stopped at Sareth’s favorite roadside stop at O Taki. Strettarea to sample Khmer BBQ foods (well…some tried). My husband decided to sample some rat, but I preferred to sample a very chewy frog! 

Roads were packed with bicycles through Banteay Meanchey as school children clad in white shirts and navy pants/skirts exited school grounds on mass for the day.

In the collage above… the top right photo is an example of take out Khmer style! There are several BBQ rats in the white bag on the dashboard.

During the 3 + hour trip from Battambang to Siem Reap we encountered more road upgrades and construction. We were informed most of the funding for these infrastructure upgrades is coming from either China or Japan.

This final video illustrates the BBQ Khmer foods we sampled and what traveling on highways looks like in Cambodia.

Road safety does not seem to be a priority here as people ride in the backs of trucks, on the tops of loaded vehicles, or pass on the right or left! We witnessed 2 lane highways regularly being utilized as 3 lane roads as vehicles manoeuvred between the center while vehicles were occupying both lanes of the highway!

Once arriving at our destination of Siem Reap many of us took advantage of the hotel’s pool for a much needed break to relax and unwind! We are based at Dinata Boutique Hotel for the next 3 nights.

Tomorrow we explore the famous Angkor Wat!

 

Life in a floating village–Kampong Luong, Cambodia! Then Exploring Battambang.

May 2019

As we boarded the bus to depart from Phnom Penh we had no idea this would be another eye opening, life changing day in Cambodia! Heading to our next destination, Battambang, we would travel northwest for 295 km which should take about 5 hours and 40 mins. However, in addition to stopping for coffee and baked goodies; and visiting a location where mentally challenged people craft items from recycled silver; we were stopping to tour and visit an authentic floating village of about 300+ families at Kampong Luong.

As usual, our packed day would not end there…Once arriving in Battambang we would take a bamboo train to watch the sunset, then tour the downtown area prior to a late dinner! Here is a glimpse of our day.

Our tour guide (and most members of our tour group), adore coffee in the morning so our first stop was Tous les Jours authentic Bakery and Coffee shop. Due to my gluten intolerance, these bakery visits are difficult for me as I usually can not eat anything on the menu. Oh well…I gain less weight this way!

The modes of transport in Cambodia have their own unique flair. There are many motorcycles and tuktuks in Cambodia, but unlike Vietnam, honking is less common. Many motorcycles pull long carts (remork-moto). Foreigners can rent motorcycles here but do your research prior to choosing this option. There is extensive infrastructure upgrades occurring, and dirt roads and huge potholes are still common in areas.

Sareth was entertaining during the bus drive teaching us about multiple different ways to wear the famous Khmer scarfs. He was so convincing with the multiple uses for the scarf for males and females that many of us purchased scarfs prior to departing from Cambodia.

Roadside housing varied from elaborate (often with French influence), to homes on stilts, or simple shacks. Overhead electrical wiring looks very similar to what we witnessed in Thailand. During our trip to the floating village, it was quite common to see skinny cows munching on sparse blades of grass along the sides of the road/highway.

This is a pictorial representation of our journey from Phnom Penh to the floating village.

As we drove down the long dirt road towards the floating village of Kampong Luong 54, Krakor, Cambodia  we were greeted by the site of garbage and remnants of previous homes. As the water levels subside on this lake (Tonle Sap), the homes must be moved. We weren’t informed how often this occurs or how far the homes must be relocated. Tonle Sap is the largest freshwater lake in South East Asia.

“The floating village of Kompong Luong offers the opportunity to visitors to discover the everyday life of Cambodian families on the Tonle Sap lake. The families live in floating houses with a constant movement of boats that brings people and goods to the village. The village consist of both Cambodian community and Vietnamese community both living in the same floating village.” For a home stay experience at this floating village check out this article written by Chris Green. https://impactexplorer.asia/kompong-luong/

As we neared the lake there were a few tiny homes situated on the land adjacent to the area where dozens of long boats were located. Emaciated cattle, dogs, and water buffalo wandered along the banks searching for sustenance. Several thin, agile Khmer boys gathered to assist the tourists in getting into the boats then free ropes for the driver. Perhaps the driver’s sons?

Later when we returned from the boat tour the same boys were collecting plastic and Styrofoam from the garbage heaps on the sides of this lake. As they ran to assist with the docking of the boat one little boy lost his flip-flops and cut his foot just prior to jumping into the murky greenish/brown lake water. They must be incredibly resilient children as the water was polluted and unsanitary. The little boys were friendly, helpful, athletic, welcoming, and had the most beautiful smiles.

Our tour group was informed there were over 300 families living in the floating village. Additional research indicates this number could be substantially low! Citizens from both Cambodia and Vietnam live together in this floating community. Interesting enough, although the village is located in Cambodia it is apparently considered a Vietnamese settlement?

We didn’t see any life jackets (except hanging in our tour boat!) and children seemed very confident independently maneuvering their vessels.

The lake water was used for bathing, swimming, washing, fishing, transporting boats and loads, and the outhouses were located directly above the water!

This experience was another eye-opener for us.  There was so much to observe and learn about this unique way of life. I have created 2 videos about our time at the floating village. This is Part One from our arrival until we reached the floating school in the village. (Note the boats docked in front of the school which the children quite capably navigate through the waters.).

According to our guide, students who get to attend schools in primary grades usually attend from 8:30–11:30 for the first 4 years of their education.

As we toured through Kampong Luong we passed the school, fueling station, phone stores, health center, convenience stores, ice shop, church, temple, police station, 2-3 home stays run by the village, fishing supply store, machine shop, and many other small businesses. The recreation building was located near the outer edge of the village. Entrepreneurs even rowed around the village with wares or vegetables in their heavily laden boats.

Children waved and adults seemed neutral or tolerant regarding the invasion of tourists exploring their community. The pace was slow and peaceful –except for the occasional loud engines as the longboats passed by.

No drive throughs. No junk food. No obesity. No eating unnecessarily. Food here is for sustenance and survival requires an active lifestyle. Turquoise, green and white are popular colors used on many of the homes and businesses here. Here is the second half of our trip through this unique floating village.

It would be fascinating to experience a home stay in Kampong Luong … but due to my current digestive unrest in Cambodia, I am sure I couldn’t survive the poor sanitation conditions!

However…. I would have loved to teach these delightful children!

Back on the bus… searching for emergency bathrooms! Then onward to Battambang–the second most populated city in Cambodia.

After unloading our belongings at the “Classy Hotel” we headed out on tuktuks to drive 4km to the train station, O-Dambong, where we would all board bamboo trains to ride through the country and observe a sunset Cambodian style.

The bamboo trains were very simplistic. The train is known as a norry, a 3m sq. metal and wood frame, covered with strips of bamboo. The “bamboo” section of the train was the floor boards which were covered in a reed mat upon which we sat. 10 from our group plus Sareth were divided into 2 “trains”.

Each “train” had a driver at the rear. There was no safety gear on this excursion. We sat bundled together on the mat and zoomed down the railway tracks. The rural landscape was lush and the ride was fun.

We had 2 brief stops en route to the bridge (sunset observation point). One stop occurred when a herd of cattle was led over the tracks to new grazing areas. The second occurred when a family was coming the opposite direction down the track! They stopped, got off their ‘train’ and lifted their base and wheels off the track until we passed then re positioned them on the track.

The only casualty occurred when a large hornet flew into my knuckle resulting in a substantial sting, swelling and welt. Apparently I “took one for the team!” However, I wasn’t thrilled about getting another sting as I previously was stung by a wasp at Halong Bay while kayaking! Thanks to Julie and Mac who shared their antihistamine cream to reduce the swelling each time. 😬

Presenting our sunset adventure on the Bamboo train.

While anticipating the sunset at the bridge area we heard croaking followed by a quick splash. A local man was sifting through the reeds capturing frogs and passing them to (possibly family) members waiting up the bank. Dinner?

After a beautiful return trip aboard our bamboo train admiring the romantic beauty inspired by the setting sun’s hues and impact on the scenery, we boarded our Tuktuks. It was time to return to our hotel after another late evening dinner and photo shoot at the enormous Ta Dumbong (Powerful Black Man) statue in central Battambang.

It was another packed day with Intrepid tours! Tomorrow we tour rural Battambang via bicycles then travel 3-4 hours to our next destination–Siem Reap.

Note: I would like to acknowledge that some of the photos/videos in this blog post were taken by my husband, Mark, or shared by members of our Intrepid tour group.

 

 

Cambodia–A Myriad of Emotions. Tuol Sleng, Tarantulas, Tropical Storms!

Early May 2019

Cambodia has a tragic past which deeply effects its people–lifestyle, family structure, culture, economy, basic survival, trust. This 7 day guided tour through Cambodia merely scratched the surface of new awareness and understanding of this country and its amazing people.

Commencing this Intrepid tour as a naive tourist; I departed emotionally haunted, shocked, and much more deeply connected to the needs and future visions of these resilient, hard working Cambodian people. Keeping in mind that 54% of the population is under 18 years of age, there is much rebuilding and new direction likely to occur in the next few decades. Here is a pictorial overview of some of the day’s highlights.

This would be our first full day in Cambodia. The heinous historical atrocities committed by the Khmer Rouge shared and viewed during the morning tours, would deeply horrify and sicken us all. This day took a heavy emotional toll on our group members. Some chose to reflect and not to pursue optional activities today. However, others ventured out to explore the capital city Phnom Penh (population over 2.1 million)–even tasting a certain type of arachnid at lunch! Several of us toured the National Museum even being detained by a sudden Tropical storm! At night most of the group also took an optional tour up the Mekong River before dinner.

To be truthful… I have been taking Imodium and Charcoal tablets trying to stabilize unhappy travel bowels… I’m not alone either!!!

After seeing the Hanoi Hilton, Cu Chi Tunnels, War Remnants museums, and people effected by Agent Orange in Vietnam… I knew emotionally I couldn’t handle seeing the Tuol Sleng Genocide Museum and Khmer Rouge Killing fields in person today. How people can conduct genocide and commit such heinous crimes on other human beings is so deeply disturbing and wrong! It was difficult enough to look at the photos and listen to information from my Intrepid tour group after the visit.

After additional research I learned, on April 17th 1975 the Khmer Rouge entered the capital of Phnom Penh and began a “reign of terror under leader Pol Pot that left up to 2 million people dead through starvation, execution, and overwork. ” abc.net.au/news/2014-08-07/an-Khmer-rouge-timeline/5655920

This genocide of one’s own race is on its own intolerable and sickening; however, trying to fathom that the number of individuals murdered was the size of the entire population of the largest city in all of Cambodia is beyond belief!

The group toured the Tuol Sleng Genocide Museum which was a former school converted into the Khmer Rouge torture center. Part of the tour included meeting 2 survivors who have now written their stories about their experiences at S-21. It is estimated that over 20,000 people from 1975 to 1979 were held and tortured at this site. The Choeung Ek Memorial contains a stupa made up of 8,000 human skulls which marks the site of the “Killing Fields” execution grounds for  victims tortured at Tuol Sleng.

Warning: There are some disturbing images in this pictorial representation of Tuol Sleng Genocide Museum, Choeung Ek Memorial, and the Killing Fields. But… This is true, recent history.

For a complete change of pace…Many of the group went out for lunch together and Mark and Tyler decided to consume something very unusual. Ready? Ever wanted to try Tarantulas? Personally… not a chance!

But Tyler ordered 3 Tarantulas for lunch. He ate two and Mark ate the third one!

Notice Tyler laughing as Mark tried his arachnid! As they both concluded that there wasn’t a chance they’d like more in the future… I decided to create both a collage and GIF of the memorable experience!

They both said “We took one for the team!” This really unique restaurant called “Friends” was located near our Cardamom Hotel and the National Museum. It is a training restaurant run by the “Friends International” organization.

There is also a shop located adjacent to the restaurant where handicrafts (created out of recycled materials) were made by orphaned children and street youth and sold by the Friends organization to fund schooling and job training opportunities for these children.

“Friends-International is an international social enterprise and registered non-governmental organization focusing on children’s empowerment established in Cambodia in 1994. “Wikipedia

This is a non-religious organization which started working to assist street youth in Phnom Penh in 1994. There is a crisis of orphaned children and street youth here due to the decimation of families caused by recent mass genocide discussed earlier in this blog post. Unfortunately, there are some dishonest organizations claiming to assist the orphans here too.

The Friends organization has validity and reliability and seems to be making a true difference to the futures of many youth here.  Tourists are encouraged to avoid giving money or food to orphans who are begging. Instead, children are encouraged to attend school, then learn trades to become more self sufficient. The schooling and job training is funded by tourists purchasing handicrafts and food prepared by the youth.

Many of us purchased items from the Friends gift shop. I purchased jewelry created out of bullets which were pounded flat and cut into shapes adorned by recycled paper beads.

Jen, Mark and I decided to visit the National Museum to learn more about Traditional Khmer art and view religious artifacts. The 1920s reddish colored building is an intriguing architectural design. The entrance fee was $10 US/person. I wished I had time to attend the Cambodian dance workshop offered here!

This video highlights our adventure in Cambodia’s capital city from lunch into the afternoon including the Tropical Rainstorm. Listen for the Thunder!

As you can see… when in the midst of a tropical rainstorm why not relax and try out the local beer?

Jen, Mark and I squashed into an tiny available Tuktuk to head home. The driver had just raised the plastic side walls which were added to protect riders from getting drenched during the heavy down pour!

Another packed day… but we are not finished! Next we headed out on another optional Sunset boat cruise along the Mekong River!

Our guide Sareth joined this tour and taught us about the meaning of the Cambodian flag. We were informed the flag of Cambodia has 3 colors and 3 towers–but there are actually 5 towers? The blue represents the King. The red represent the nation (people). The white represents religion (pure).

The sunset was glorious and magical. The riverside views depicted a population which utilized water vessels of all shapes, sizes, and conditions. The discrepancy between the rich and the poor was evident as we traveled down the river.

It was a lovely way to unwind and enjoy the activity along the Mekong River. The cocktails were lovely too. We inquired about the safety of the ice, but were told the ice was safe for consumption.

After docking, we ended our extremely full day by reuniting with all 12 of our Intrepid tour group and Sareth for a final group dinner in Phnom Penh.

Tomorrow we head off to Battambang and visit a floating village!

 

 

 

Cambodia here we come! HCM City to Phnom Penh!

Early May 2019

Bright and early our newly formed Intrepid team of 12, plus our Cambodian guide Sareth, met by the steps of our hotel in anticipation of our upcoming adventure. Laden with cases we departed from Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam to board the public bus bound for our new destination of Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

Highlights from our trip Ho Chi Minh City to Phnom Penh, Cambodia May 6th 2019

Our trip would include border crossings and the estimated length of travel today was 10 hours! It would take about 2 1/2 hours to the first border crossing. After arrival in Phnom Penh we would check into our hotel then quickly head out for a tuk tuk (Cambodian style) tour of the downtown area.

We entered this next stage of our tour with fresh knowledge as we prepared to cross borders into Cambodia. Sareth, our guide, offered some introductory information to ease our transition into Cambodia.

We learned Khmer is the proper name for a Cambodian person. Generally people here are easy going and laugh a lot. It is rude to touch somebody’s head. 4,000 reil = $1 USA ATM. 54% of the population of this country is below 18 years of age! Wars have really effected family structures here!

Currency in Cambodia also required thought and preparation. Cash is available from ATM machines in Cambodia (as in Vietnam), but the bills you receive are in US dollars. We were advised to only carry small amounts of cash while travelling.

Although Riel is the national currency of Cambodia, usually prices were quoted in US dollars. Change is often returned in Riel though. So it’s to your benefit to learn money conversion values quickly! Also… Be careful about the US bills you bring. We were advised to only bring US $1, $5 and $10 bills. The bills must be crisp, not torn or marked, and newer than 2006. Members of our group did experience refusal at hotels if bills were crumbled or too old!

The 12 members of this tour group included 3 couples from our previous Intrepid tour through Vietnam and 6 new tour partners. The countries/cultures we represented were quite global: 4 Canadians (Nanaimo and Calgary), 4 Australians (Adelaide, and Canberra), 1 from Chile, 2 from New Zealand, 1 from Romania. However… the Romanian lived in Switzerland; a New Zealander lived in Brisbane; and several of us hold dual citizenships. The group was a prime example of what an interwoven global community our world is now.

Day 1 of our Intrepid tour of Cambodia

Here’s my video reflecting our day departing from Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam at 7:30 am travelling by public bus, passing through 2 border crossings (no photography permitted at border crossings), then continuing our travels through Cambodia to Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

In Vietnam 🇻🇳 there are red and yellow flags displayed everywhere—yellow stars are the national flag of Vietnam, yellow scythes represent communism. Motorcycles are the main source of transportation for families. Vehicles drive on the right side of the road (mainly). Traditional conical straw hats are common. Pagodas are seen occasionally; but unlike Thailand, there are minimal Buddhist Wats or places dedicated to religious study.

Roadside photos reflecting daily life

Crossing into Cambodia… The most immediate differences were: no more red and yellow flags; large billboards of the King; driving is also on the right side of the road (unlike Thailand); increase in cars and trucks; variances between areas of poverty and wealth; and Buddhist Wats and religious temples.

However, in both countries the rivers are fundamentally important to their economy and food production; weather in Early May is extremely hot (32-40 degrees C) and humid; and local men lift up their shirts and expose their bellies to cool off!

Border crossings were hectic with lengthy lines and masses of people. (And this wasn’t high tourist season!). First we needed to complete forms and pass our passports and papers to our guide—who then passed them to another individual. There were some mix ups at the booths, but everything was solved and we progressed through the first border crossing to exit Vietnam. No photographs allowed!

Next we had to walk, following our guide, a fair distance to the Cambodian buildings where we completed more forms and repeated the passport process again to enter Cambodia. I didn’t see any wheelchairs or mobility supports, so I’m not sure how physically challenged people would cope? Thankfully Sareth solved issues when they occurred and we all progressed into Cambodia.

Some members of our group quickly bought new SIM cards for their phones and Cambodian Riel and US dollars, then we were back on the public bus heading to Phonon Penh the capital city of Cambodia. This bustling city of over 16.5 million people has been the national capital since French colonization and is known as the nations industrial, cultural, and economic center.

Tuktuk tour of Phnom Penh led by Sareth

After registering at the Cardamom Hotel, we decided to take the optional Tuktuk tour of the city. $5 US/person lead by our guide Sareth.

The French architecture is stunning and we really enjoyed the delicious sweets Sareth shared. Tourists and locals enjoyed the sights and sounds of the lively evening activities. Entrepreneurs approached us to buy products like: sweet treats, hand fans, clothing, even releasing birds to bring you good luck. Eamonn was approached by children to release a bird and he released it when we were down on the main pier.

Most tuk tuks had barriers on the outside walls where you sit, as protection. We were informed to keep purses and bags hidden and protected as there is a problem with bags being stolen as motorcycles speed past near the tuktuks. Our Tuktuk driver’s son ran over and begged to join his dad as he toured us through the city center. In spite of the broken rear vision mirror and no helmets on our driver or son, it was a fun way to experience the city.

Tuktuk tour of Phnom Penh

This short video reflects our fun and memorable evening activities in Phnom Penh. We saw many highlights including: the Royal Palace (from a distance), Independence Monument, and Norodom Sihanouk Memorial commemorating former King Norodom.

Tomorrow the group views Tuol Sleng genocide museum and the Killing Fields, then the National Museum and Royal Palace (optional), and an optional boat cruise down the Mekong River. Wait until you see what Tyler and Mark eat!!!!